A scientist conducting an experiment in a lab

reBUILD damaged tissues using stem-cell generated therapies

The reBUILD theme focuses on developing cells and tissues from stem cells that can be used clinically to repair or replace damaged or destroyed organs.

The field of medicine known as regenerative medicine is a major area of promise for stem cells. It focuses on developing and applying new treatments to heal tissues and organs and restoring functions that have been lost due to aging, disease, damage, or defects. Here, it is the stem cells themselves that are the product, providing an opportunity to deliver cell-based therapies for currently untreatable chronic disease.

The reBUILD research portfolio extends from early-stage approaches to stem cell-derived cells and tissues through to the first-in-human clinical trials. To achieve these goals, reBUILD will address key bottlenecks in the development pipeline, including access to clinical grade cell lines, development of more efficient protocols describing the differentiation and manufacturing of cultures of stem cells, and addressing patient delivery.

Researchers within reBUILD are working toward stem cell-based therapies for neurological degeneration, heart disease present from birth, diabetes, ulcerative colitis, and chronic kidney disease. reBUILD research will draw on both well-developed projects and pilot approaches to novel therapies.

reNEW is well-positioned to address existing challenges to delivery, quality and safety within an area of ever-changing compliance standards. Our unique international partnership structure enables us to both assess unique geographical and regulatory barriers and work to overcome potential bottlenecks.

reBUILD focuses on the use of stem cells to recreate tissue that’s been damaged or destroyed.

Theme lead

Professor Eelco J.P. de Koning
Professor

Eelco J.P. de Koning

Professor Eelco de Koning introduced transplantation of insulin-producing cells isolated from donor pancreas (islet transplantation) for a small group of patients with Type 1 diabetes in the Netherlands. By making insulin-producing cells from stem cells in the lab, he aims to make this treatment more widely available.
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Professor Eelco J.P. de Koning
Professor

Eelco J.P. de Koning

Professor Eelco de Koning introduced transplantation of insulin-producing cells isolated from donor pancreas (islet transplantation) for a small group of patients with Type 1 diabetes in the Netherlands. By making insulin-producing cells from stem cells in the lab, he aims to make this treatment more widely available.
See more

Discover the 4 other research themes of reNEW